A List Apart

 
 
 
 
For People Who Make Websites
 

A List Apart (ISSN: 1534-0295) explores the design, development, and meaning of web content, with a special focus on web standards and best practices.

We began as a mailing list in 1997 and launched this website in 1998. You can visit the ghosts of ALA past by reading our history. See our Masthead to meet the current crew.

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A List Apart 4.0

by Jeffrey Zeldman August 22, 2005

 
From the crown of its cranium to the tips of its Ruby-slippered toes, A List Apart 4.0 is both old and new. Old in its mission to help people who make websites see farther and jump higher. New in its design, structure, publishing system, and brand extensions.
The magazine has long advocated accessibility and web standards, providing deep and sometimes controversial insights into these areas and not infrequently presenting ideas and methods that change the way you think and work. We will never abandon this subject area, but we are once more widening our gaze to encompass disciplines and themes beyond those that have obsessed us for the past five years.

I say “once more” because A List Apart started as a broad and inclusive explorer of all things web design. Our visual and structural relaunch provides the perfect platform from which to expand our self-definition and broaden our subject matter.
— https://alistapart.com/article/ala40
 

A List Apart Style Guide

General notes

Articles written for publication on A List Apart use an informal, conversational tone, though not at the cost of clarity or correctness. Experts require neither excessive formality nor excessive casualness to express their authority. If you write with ALA’s readership in mind and sound like yourself, you’re most of the way there already.

Concise articles with snappy intros

Our article space is intentionally limited to a single page. There is no room for meandering, no space for encyclopedic completeness. You need to get in, score, and get out. State your idea clearly and quickly. If your tutorial solves a problem, state the problem. Don’t warm up to your subject by preceding it with generalizations. You don’t need to tell our readers that Tim Berners-Lee invented the web before getting to your point.

Keep your readers in mind

Experienced web professionals read ALA. If you dumb down your article, you will offend these readers. But our readers come from many backgrounds—a reader who knows all 317 CSS workarounds might not necessarily have heard of Edward Tufte—so take time to define your terms and provide pertinent background information, if only as a link.

Read the style guide »