Click Here to Kill Everybody: Security and Survival in a Hyper-connected World

 
 
 
The internet is powerful, but it is not safe. As “smart” devices proliferate the risks will get worse, unless we act now.
— Bruce Schneier
 

Published by W. W. Norton & Company, Sept., 2018
A book by Bruce Schneier
ISBN: 978-0393608885

From driverless cars to smart thermostats, from autonomous stock-trading systems to drones equipped with their own behavioral algorithms, the internet now has direct effects on the physical world. While this computerized future, often called the Internet of Things, carries enormous potential, best-selling author Bruce Schneier argues that catastrophe awaits in its new vulnerabilities and dangers. Forget data theft: cutting-edge digital attackers can now literally crash your car, pacemaker, and home security system, as well as everyone else's. In Click Here to Kill Everybody, Schneier explores the risks and security implications of our new, hyper-connected era, and lays out common-sense policies that will allow us to enjoy the benefits of this omnipotent age without falling prey to the consequences of its insecurity. From principles for a more resilient Internet of Things to a recipe for sane government oversight, Schneier's vision is required reading for anyone invested in human flourishing.

Read More and Buy the Book »
(Please support your local bookseller.)

 

 

Extras

 

Talks at Google – Bruce Schneier: "Click Here to Kill Everybody"

Published on Oct 11, 2018

Computer security professional, privacy specialist and writer Bruce Schneier discusses "Click Here to Kill Everybody", his latest book exploring the risks and security implications of our new, hyper-connected era. Bruce lays out common-sense policies that will allow us to enjoy the benefits of this omnipotent age without falling prey to the consequences of its insecurity.

 

The Cyberlaw Podcast: Click Here to Kill Everybody

 

By Stewart Baker
Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Cyberlaw 230 photo - Bruce Schneier and Stewart Baker

We are fully back from our August hiatus, and leading off a series of great interviews, I talk with Bruce Schneier about his new book, Click Here to Kill Everybody: Security and Survival in a Hyper-Connected World. Bruce is an internationally renowned technologist, privacy and security commentator, and someone I respect a lot more than I agree with. But his latest book opens new common ground between us, and we both foresee a darker future for a world that has digitally connected things that can kill people without figuring out a way to secure them. Breaking with Silicon Valley consensus, we see security regulation in the Valley’s future, despite all the well-known downsides that regulation will bring. We also find plenty of room for disagreement on topics like encryption policy and attribution.

 
 

 

The Lawfare Podcast – Bruce Schneier on “Click Here to Kill Everybody”

By Jen Patja Howell
Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Security technologist Bruce Schneier's latest book, "Click Here to Kill Everybody: Security and Survival in a Hyper-connected World," argues that it won't be long before everything modern society relies on will be computerized and on the internet. This drastic expansion of the so-called 'internet of things,' Schneier contends, vastly increases the risk of cyberattack. To help figure out just how concerned you should be, last Thursday, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Schneier. They talked about what it would mean to live in a world where everything, including Ben's shirt, was a computer, and how Schneier's latest work adds to his decades of advocacy for principled government regulation and oversight of 'smart devices.'

 

 

Harry Shearer “Le Show” – Interview with Bruce Schneier, author of “Click Here To Kill Everybody”

00:00 Open/ The Apologies of the Week: Wells Fargo, Rebel Wilson, Justin Trudeau, Delta Airlines
02:36 Trump this week
04:13 The Appresidentice: Who's getting fired next, and by whom?
10:36 Interview with Bruce Schneier, author of 'Click Here To Kill Everybody'
56:34 'Always There' by Ronnie Laws /Smart World/ Close